About mushpep

Treasurer / Membership Secretary

National Forays – 2018

The North American Mycological Association has just opened registration for the National Foray, which will be held in Salem, OR from October 11–14, at the Macleay Conference Center.

NAMA will hold its first Regional Foray in Mississippi at The Gray Center in Canton, MS, just north of Jackson.  This will take place June 28 – July 1.

Please see the NAMA website (www.namyco.org) for more information or to register.

Where Can I Hunt Mushrooms?

Where Can I Hunt Mushrooms?

This is the third most common question that we at the Ohio Mushroom Society receive, right after “What kind of mushroom is this?” and “Can I eat it?”.  These are all very good questions, but often the answers are not simple.

Regarding foraging places, OMS volunteers work very hard to establish good relationships with public and private landholding institutions, and private landowners.  Some of these relationships take years to mature to the point where we are allowed to conduct a one-time, or even periodic forays, in exchange for the knowledge of species diversity that the landowners gain regarding their properties.  This trust can be instantly broken by rogue individuals using these properties as their “own” mushroom spot.

Imagine a motorist with a flat tire stuck in front of your house.  Decent human being that you are, you ask if you can help.  They have a spare, but no jack and no tools in the trunk.  Of course, you open your garage and allow them to borrow yours.  Now, how would you feel the next time you are barbecuing in the back yard, hear clanging and rustling in your garage, and after investigating, see the same individual helping themself to your tools to change their oil?!

So, Rule Number One of mushroom hunting is NO POACHING.  Please forage ONLY on properties where you currently have permission.

If you decide to take a risk and poach anyway, you DO NOT have permission from the Ohio Mushroom Society.  You DO NOT “know” any of our board members, or previous foray hosts.  Can you believe that a couple individuals, when confronted on private property, actually had the nerve to name-drop on an innocent gentleman who gave his personal time to provide an interesting and informative cultivation program to our members?!  This type of behavior will get you banned from the OMS.

What’s the harm?  There’s plenty for everyone!!  I’m not cutting down the “tree”, just harvesting some “fruit”.  If you are convinced that your actions are sustainable and that your activities do no harm, then do what we do and approach the landowner honestly and ask for permission.  Provide your reasoning.  Give them your name and contact information, and sign a waiver if asked.

So where can you hunt mushrooms without asking first?  In Ohio, the answers are our State Forests (“State Forest” is part of the property name), the Wayne National Forest, and our State Wildlife Management Areas (“WMA” is part of the property name).

Where can you likely hunt, with advance permission?  Our Ohio State Parks (many, but not all, allow hunting, foraging for mushrooms, berry picking, etc.); your local city park; and cemeteries (the older and more derelict the better!).  Simply call first.

Collecting mushrooms and other living things is FORBIDDEN in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park; regional park districts (such as Cleveland Metroparks, Lake Metroparks, Summit MetroParks, Geauga Park District, etc.); Ohio State Nature Preserves (“Nature Preserve” is part of the property name); private residential camps and retreat centers (such as Camp Asbury and Boy Scout/Girl Scout camps), private Arboreta (Holden, Dawes, etc.); and University properties (such as Squire Valleevue and Valley Ridge Farms).

Why does it have to be this way?  Ohio is 44th in the nation with just 4.2 percent of our land in the public domain; 95.8 percent is all private property.  Public land includes highway right-of-ways!  So our tiny public properties hosting millions of visitors each year can’t possibly sustain all of our wants for free food, free landscaping rocks, free pets, or free flowers.  And private landowners have a right to maintain the resources on their properties for themselves or their paying guests/clients/students.  They have a right to protect themselves from lawsuits by people falling down their hillside, or drowning in their lakes.

So please, ask first.  Help us keep OMS a respected organization.  When we all act to keep our actions sustainable, we will continue to be welcomed.  Thanks!!

by Debra Shankland, OMS president

16 April 2018

Fusicolla Merismoides – A Fungal Potpourri

This is a remarkable species that is a conglomeration of various species resulting in an oozing, dripping orange slime. It is most often seen in the spring, often by morel hunters. It typically covers a grape vine or stump. It may form slimy stalactites of orange goo. No two samples have been found genetically identical. Some report a sweet smell which may come from yeast. The mix may also include a different yeast species which gives it the orange color and actually kills some of the other fungi involved. Some Zygomycetes are in the mix as well. There needs to be more study on this complex organism.

http://www.dnabarcodes2011.org/conference/program/schedule/treeslime.pdf

–Walt Sturgeon

 Fusicolla Merismoides by Walt Sturgeon

Fusicolla Merismoides by Walt Sturgeon

Fusicolla Merismoides by Walt Sturgeon

If you are interested in contributing to the mushrooms of the month please contact the web master using the contact form and he will provide you with submission information.

Some Early Spring Ohio Fungi

Welcome to the February installment of Mushrooms of the Month.

Flammulina velutipes by Walt Sturgeon

Pseudoplectania nigrella by Walt Sturgeon

Sarcoscypha austriaca by Walt Sturgeon

Urnula craterium by Walt Sturgeon

If you are interested in contributing to the mushrooms of the month please contact the web master using the contact form and he will provide you with submission information.

Mushroom Risotto Recipe

Yield 6 servings
Active Time 20 minutes
Total Time 50 minutes
Ingredients
5 cups chicken or vegetable broth, divided
1 cup warm water
3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 pound portobello mushrooms, thinly sliced
1 pound white button mushrooms, thinly sliced
1/2 ounce dried Porcini
2 shallots, diced
1 1/2 cups Arborio rice
1/2 cup dry white wine
sea salt to taste
freshly ground black pepper to taste
3 tablespoons finely chopped chives
4 tablespoons butter
1/3 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese

risotto_ingredients

Instructions
Bring Porcini and 1 cup water to boil in a saucepan. Simmer for 5 minutes and transfer Porcini with a slotted spoon to a cutting board.
Add broth to the Porcini liquid in sauce pan and just bring to a boil. Lower heat to simmer and keep warm.
Chop porcini mushrooms. Warm 2 tablespoons olive oil in deep large skillet on medium heat. Stir in Portobello and button mushrooms and cook until soft (3 minutes). Add Porcini and cook 2 minutes. Remove mushrooms and liquid and set aside.

risotto_saute_mushrooms

Add 1 tablespoon olive oil to skillet and add the shallots. Cook for 1 minute and add the rice. Stir rice for 2 minutes to coat with oil.

risotto_rice

When the rice turns a pale golden color pour in the wine and stir continuously until the rice absorbs the wine. Add 1/2 cup of broth and stir until the broth is absorbed. Repeat with remaining broth until all of the broth is absorbed and the rice is neither crunchy nor too soft (al dente), about 15 minutes.

risotto_add_broth

Remove from heat. Stir in mushrooms with liquid, butter, chives and cheese. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Enjoy!

risotto_done