June Rainstorms Make Fungi Forms

contributed by Lonelle Yoder

Early June here in central Ohio was WET and HOT! As miserable as the torrential rain, heat, and humidity (and accompanying power outages) was for us humans, the mushrooms loved it and came forth en masse – perhaps, like me, you’ve found things growing around your home and woods that you don’t usually see. A mini foray around my urban yard last week yielded an array of fun finds.

Coprinopsis sp
This Coprinopsis species has been popping up in all the beds I mulched this spring – perhaps it arrived with the mulch? I love the way it deliquesces. I also love the word “deliquesce.”
Parasola plicatilis?
Here’s another coprinoid that I often see in abundance after a rainy period, probably Parasola plicatilis, pleated inkcap
Peziza sp
This cup fungus (Peziza) is a new one for me – apparently they’re difficult to ID to species without a microscope.
Xylaria polymorpha
You might find it surprising to see Xylaria polymorpha growing in grass – I would too, if my neighbor hadn’t told me there was a large sycamore tree in this part of the yard which was cut down before I moved in. This is the first year I’ve seen the buried roots send up Dead Man’s Fingers, but they have appeared several times this spring.
Candelleomyces candelleanus
Here’s another gift from those buried sycamore roots: Candolleomyces candolleanus (formerly Psathyrella), Pale Brittlestem
Laccaria sp
Laccaria sp. growing on mulch
LBM with coprinoid lurking in the background
I’m not sure what this guy is, but he has a coprinoid buddy keeping watch over him
unidentified white mushroom
Another unknown species pushing its way out of a log. It was gone a couple days later when I went back to see if it had grown; perhaps eaten by a squirrel?
Trichia decipiens & Arcyria cinerea?
Another log in a shady spot produced multiple slime molds! The orange and brown globes at the bottom are possibly Trichia decipiens in two stages of maturity, and the white fuzz at the top later developed into what you see in the next photo:
Arcyria cinerea & Stemonitis splendens
The same log, three days later: Arcyria cinerea at the top and Stemonitis splendens, chocolate tube slime, at the bottom.

This week’s dry heat has sent all the mushrooms and slime molds back underground, but I hope to see more of them when the rains return. I’m especially keeping an eye out for these earth stars I found in my “way-back” last August (possibly Geastrum saccatum?):

Geastrum saccatum? Aug. 2021

1 thought on “June Rainstorms Make Fungi Forms

  1. What cool photos! I see the most mushrooms in my neighborhood while walking the dog (2x/day), since I do that lots more than woodland hikes specifically to find mushrooms. Thanks for reminding us all that ‘shrooms are anywhere you look!

    Debra

    Extremist senators have turned the Supreme Court into a republican rubber stamp

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