2018 Dick Grimm Memorial Banquet

2018 Dick Grimm Memorial Banquet

This popular annual event will take place on Saturday, November 3, 6:30 p.m. at Wooster’s Broken Rocks restaurant.  We will have our own room downstairs in the rustic-artistic Rox Gastropub, and enjoy the full menu of fresh, locally-sourced and lovingly prepared food.

We very much look forward to a presentation entitled The Rise of Yeast: How the Sugar Fungus Shaped Civilization, by British-born mycologist and university professor Nicholas P. Money.  This man of letters is the author of many excellent books, including his latest, The Rise of Yeast, and historical fiction, as well as scientific papers.

Head to Wooster early to enjoy the annual Buckeye Book Fair, where you can purchase books by Nik and many other Ohio authors.  It takes place 9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. in Fisher Auditorium.

Please contact Debra Shankland at dks@clevelandmetroparks.com or 440-263-2334 to reserve your spot for the Banquet.  Space is limited!

 

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2018 OMS Fall Foray – Hiram College

2018 OMS Fall Foray

Dates: Oct 6-7, 2018

We look forward to returning to the rich and unique, 500-acre James H. Barrow Field Station of Hiram College, located in Portage County, for our annual Fall Foray.  This living laboratory supports over 200 acres of mature Beech-Maple forest, along with other forest types and riparian habitats.

Our ongoing partnership with Hiram College has been very beneficial.  It could even be considered symbiotic if that wasn’t such a corny mycological analogy!  Seriously, engaging with Hiram students on this foray injects a great energy into the event, and the college faculty and staff have been wonderful hosts.  The Field Station is just three miles away from the Hiram College campus.

In addition, we’ve secured permission at a private property, Camp Asbury, for our Sunday foray.  Composed of a variety of mature and nurtured habitats, Camp Asbury always yields interesting and many different finds from those at the Field Station, which is only four miles away.

We are very fortunate to have author and outstanding field mycologist Walt Sturgeon as this foray’s mycologist and presenter.  His illustrated program about “Edible Mushrooms on Wood” will be of interest to everyone.  Winning national awards for his mushroom photography, Walt takes care in putting together presentations that are beautiful to look at, but also richly document the key features and habitats of the mushrooms that are included.

The Kennedy Observation Building at the Field Station will be our headquarters for this foray on Saturday.  It can be accessed at 11305 Wheeler Road in Garrettsville, OH  44231, between State Routes 82 and 305.  To download a map and directions, go to http://www.hiram.edu/academics/support-services/field-station/map-and-directions/

On Sunday we will commute by car caravan over to Camp Asbury to meet with camp director, ecologist, and foray guide, Rev. Bill Graham.

Space for those seeking on-site accommodations at the Field Station is very limited.  Advance registration for those wishing to camp onsite is required by contacting foray coordinator Debra Shankland between August 30 – October 3 only.  You can call 440-263-2334 or email dks@clevelandmetroparks.com to register or get additional information.

Schedule of events

Friday, October 5

Limited primitive camping at the Observation Building available beginning at 6:30 p.m.

Saturday, October 6

9 a.m.  Registration and coffee at the Observation Building

9:40 a.m.  Welcome and orientation

10 a.m. – 12N  Morning forays

12:15 – 1 p.m.  Potluck lunch (please see “What to Bring” below)

1:30 – 2 p.m.  Illustrated discussion of “Edible Mushrooms on Wood” by Walt Sturgeon

2:15 – 4:15  Afternoon forays

5:15 – 5:40  Table talk concerning noteworthy collected specimens

6:10 p.m.  Dinner at The Brick in Garrettsville (go to FreddyBurger.com to see the menu)

Sunday, October 7

9 – 10:30 a.m.  Coffee & light breakfast at the Observation Building; review collections

10:30 – ?  Clean up

11:15 a.m. – 1 p.m.  Final foray at Camp Asbury in Hiram

1 – 1:40 p.m.  ID & discussion of finds

2 p.m.  Farewell!

OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS

Limited, primitive on-site camping at the Observation Building is allowed free of charge on October 5 & 6 only.  There are no developed camping facilities here, so you must be self-sufficient.  There is a single restroom in the Observation Building.  Showers are available for our group at the athletic center on campus.  Contact Debra for more information, or to reserve a spot.

The Hiram Inn (http://www.thehiraminn.com) is right on Hiram’s campus two miles from the Field Station. This beautifully renovated century-and-a-half home is located on the corner of SR 700, SR 82 and SR 305.

Bed and Breakfast accommodations in picturesque Burton include the Red Maple Inn and Goodwin House.  Plan to spend $125+ per night.

Unique and affordable places to stay may be found on airbnb.  Begin your search in Garrettsville, Hiram, and Burton.

WHAT TO BRING

Please know that the Kennedy Observation Building is a learning lab for the Field Station and was not built with banquet facilities nor large groups in mind.  Space will be snug but with everyone’s help and cooperation in changing room setups, we have found it to be adequate.  Thanks in advance for remembering this!  That said, you’ll find these supplies very helpful to bring along:

  • Refillable water bottle
  • Reusable coffee/tea mug
  • Food/drink to share at the potluck; please make sure it’s ready to serve–there is just one dorm-size refrigerator and one sink, but there are plenty of electric outlets available.
  • Utensils and knives needed to serve your potluck item; cooler if necessary.
  • Cash for a donation (Forays are free, but your generosity buys coffee, paper products, nametags, goodwill for our hosting institutions, speaker expenses, and more. Thank you!)
  • Basket (paper bag can do in a pinch)
  • Sharp knife
  • Mushroom field guide(s)
  • Notepad and pencil/pen
  • Magnifier
  • Camera
  • Hat, rain gear, change of shoes/boots
  • Compass
  • Whistle

West Rim Trail – Pennsylvania

My son Phil and I take a couple of backpacking trips every year and, usually, we section hike portions of the AT. This year we were somewhat limited on time (long weekend) and decided to hike the gorgeous 30 mile West Rim Trail between Ansonia and Blackwell, PA. This hike has been labelled the “Grand Canyon of the East” and the “Best Hike in Pennsylvania”. I’ve hiked quite a few trails in central and western PA including Minister Creek, North Country Trail, Laurel Highlands, Old Loggers Trail, Black Moshannon, Black Forest trail, Ricketts Glen and Michaux State Forest on the AT near the PA/ Maryland border. The West Rim Trail stands out for its natural beauty and 1,000 foot scenic vistas above the Pine Creek gorge. Hiking in PA is not for everyone as it is very rocky and challenging on your feet. On one of our AT hikes, we met a through hiker that mentioned that if she ever hiked the AT again she would fly over Pennsylvania. Sadly, Ohio doesn’t have a single backpacking trail I can recommend as I would describe them as mostly bulldozer trails that are not worth your time (Wayne National Forest, Zaleski State Forest). At any rate, we hiked the West Rim Trail under some very wet conditions and there was a profusion of pristine mushrooms everywhere we stepped. I’m only sorry I didn’t bring some olive oil and a lightweight frying pan. See below for a sampling of our experience.

For a 3D PhotoSphere of one of the scenic overlooks follow the link below. Once it loads just click on the image and you can scroll/pan around- Jerry Pepera

https://photos.app.goo.gl/CVJUXv62wrK8T8xB9

My son, Phil and I at the Southern Terminus in Blackwell, PA

Start of a 1,000 foot climb to the rim trail.

Amanita jacksonii

http://www.mushroomexpert.com/amanita_jacksonii.html

Amanita jacksonii

Amanita rubescens

http://www.mushroomexpert.com/amanita_rubescens.html

Amanita vaginata

http://www.mushroomexpert.com/amanita_vaginata.html

Amanita bisporgeria (Deadly!)

http://www.mushroomexpert.com/amanita_bisporigera.html

Ramaria sp. (maybe fomosa)

http://www.mushroomexpert.com/ramaria_formosa.html

Craterellus cornucopioides
(Black Trumpet)

http://www.mushroomexpert.com/craterellus_cornucopioides.html

Cortinarius species

Lactarius Volemus

http://www.mushroomexpert.com/lactarius_volemus.html

Lactarius volemus

Macrolepiota procera

http://mushroomexpert.com/macrolepiota_procera.html

Omphalotus illudens

https://www.mushroomexpert.com/omphalotus_illudens.html

Stereum ostrea (Parchment paper)

https://www.mushroomexpert.com/stereum_ostrea.html

West Rim Trail – Scenic vista

West Rim Trail – Overlook

West Rim Trail – Scenic Vista

My Son’s Border Collie – Admiral

West Rim Trail – Foggy morning after a rain storm

Summer Foray Photos

The summer foray at the Zaleski ODNR complex was a great success in spite of the lack of moisture and very hot and humid weather. See below for some pictures from the event. Look for a complete write-up in the next edition of the newsletter. – Jerry

Martha Bishop giving a foray introduction.

As the morning and afternoon forays return, mushrooms are identified and organized on the ID tables. Martha Bishop and Bryan Lewis in the foreground.

John Plischke III giving a fantastic presentation on gathering Boletes with tips on edibility and preparation.

Robert Walston with lunch – Laetiporus cincinnatus (Sulfur shelf)

Walt Sturgeon during a table walk/ ID discussion.

Some of the delicious Potluck dishes brought by attendees. 

Saturday evening dinner at Lake Hope State Park Lodge.

2018 Summer Foray at Zaleski ODNR Complex – Updated Info

Summer Foray 2018 at Zaleski ODNR Complex

Dates:  July 14-15, 2018
Location:  
Zaleski ODNR Complex in Vinton County; 29371 Wheelabout Rd, McArthur OH 45651
Foray Organizer:  
Martha Bishop, bishopm@ohio.edu (740) 593-4552

Please join us for our Summer Foray in the beautiful and diverse forests of southeastern Ohio.  We will again meet at the recently renovated Zaleski ODNR Complex, 29371 Wheelabout Road, McArthur, Ohio 45651.

We will feature nationally known mycologists Walt Sturgeon and John Plischke, III.  Walt will serve as chief identifier for the foray and John will present our featured talk:  Boletes of the Northeast and Beyond.  Both Walt and John are nationally recognized as expert identifiers of fungi, and both have won numerous awards for their fungal photographs

John Plischke, III is the author of Good Mushroom Bad Mushroom: Who’s toxic, Where to find them, and how to enjoy them safely, and Morel Mushrooms and Their Poisonous Look-alikes.  John is a founding member of the Western Pennsylvania Mushroom Club, and serves as Chair of the Photography Committee for the North American Mycological Association.

Walt Sturgeon has authored or co-authored and provided photographs for several popular mushroom books including Mushrooms of Ohio, Waxcap Mushrooms of Eastern North America, Mushrooms and Other Fungi of the West Virginia High Country, and has recently published Mushrooms of the Northeast with Teresa Marrone.  Walt serves as Awards Committee Chair for the North American Mycological Association.

July 14 (Saturday)

8:30-9:30 am.  Meet at Zaleski ODNR Complex for registration and coffee.  Please bring a reusable cup and a cash donation to cover costs of coffee, rolls, etc.

10:00 am. Forays will begin.  We will carpool to several different sites in the local hills.  Please bring hiking gear, mushroom basket, small pocket knife, water bottle, and whistle.

12:15 p.m.  We will have a potluck lunch, so please bring something to share.  Please bring your own iced cooler for items that require refrigeration, and a crockpot for items that must stay hot.  A small refrigerator, stove, microwave and electric outlets are available, however, please know that you will be responsible for all preparation and clean-up of your contribution.

Please bring your dish ready to serve with a label and ingredient list, and serving utensils.  Any wild mushrooms for consumption must be verified by expert collectors.  Please do not bring any home-canned foods.

1:45 p.m.   John Plischke, III will present:  Boletes of the Northeast and Beyond.  

John says:   “Boletes can be popular sought after mushrooms.”  He will discuss places to look for boletes, and the types of trees that they are found under.  He will also talk about bolete edibility, and bolete seasons, giving a few secret hunting tips, resourced to help with ID.

2:45 Afternoon forays depart from Zaleski ODNR complex.

5:30 p.m.  Table talk with explanation of the day’s collections.

6:30 p.m.  Dinner at The Lodge at Lake Hopehttp://lakehopelodge.com/directions/

See menus on their website:  http://lakehopelodge.com/menunew

Please RSVP to bishopm@ohio.edu or (740) 593-4552 if you plan to be here for dinner so that we can reserve adequate space. On Saturday morning we will have a final count for our reservation

July 15 (Sunday)

9:00 am.  Coffee and review of collected fungi.  Please bring a reusable cup and a cash donation to cover costs of coffee, rolls, etc.

Clean up and listing of collections.  Please help out if possible.

11:30 a.m.  Sunday foray.

Accommodations:

Reserve your cabin or campsite at nearby Lake Hope State Park NOW!

1-866-644-6727 or http://parks.ohiodnr.gov/lakehope

Reservations will fill quickly.

Area hotels and other lodging for Athens, Ohio are listed at:   http://athensohio.com/category/wheretostay/

Please print out your driving directions in advance.  There is usually internet connectivity at the foray site, but connectivity may be intermittent in surrounding areas.

Check http://www.ohgo.com/dashboard/se-ohio for road conditions and flooding.  Please be aware that part of State Route 56 is closed between Athens and State Route 278 until at least July 13 for road construction.  You should be able to check the link above to determine whether the road will still be closed on the 14th.  There are alternative routes.

Here is a pdf copy of this announcement:

OMS Summer Foray 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Forays – 2018

The North American Mycological Association has just opened registration for the National Foray, which will be held in Salem, OR from October 11–14, at the Macleay Conference Center.

NAMA will hold its first Regional Foray in Mississippi at The Gray Center in Canton, MS, just north of Jackson.  This will take place June 28 – July 1.

Please see the NAMA website (www.namyco.org) for more information or to register.

Where Can I Hunt Mushrooms?

Where Can I Hunt Mushrooms?

This is the third most common question that we at the Ohio Mushroom Society receive, right after “What kind of mushroom is this?” and “Can I eat it?”.  These are all very good questions, but often the answers are not simple.

Regarding foraging places, OMS volunteers work very hard to establish good relationships with public and private landholding institutions, and private landowners.  Some of these relationships take years to mature to the point where we are allowed to conduct a one-time, or even periodic forays, in exchange for the knowledge of species diversity that the landowners gain regarding their properties.  This trust can be instantly broken by rogue individuals using these properties as their “own” mushroom spot.

Imagine a motorist with a flat tire stuck in front of your house.  Decent human being that you are, you ask if you can help.  They have a spare, but no jack and no tools in the trunk.  Of course, you open your garage and allow them to borrow yours.  Now, how would you feel the next time you are barbecuing in the back yard, hear clanging and rustling in your garage, and after investigating, see the same individual helping themself to your tools to change their oil?!

So, Rule Number One of mushroom hunting is NO POACHING.  Please forage ONLY on properties where you currently have permission.

If you decide to take a risk and poach anyway, you DO NOT have permission from the Ohio Mushroom Society.  You DO NOT “know” any of our board members, or previous foray hosts.  Can you believe that a couple individuals, when confronted on private property, actually had the nerve to name-drop on an innocent gentleman who gave his personal time to provide an interesting and informative cultivation program to our members?!  This type of behavior will get you banned from the OMS.

What’s the harm?  There’s plenty for everyone!!  I’m not cutting down the “tree”, just harvesting some “fruit”.  If you are convinced that your actions are sustainable and that your activities do no harm, then do what we do and approach the landowner honestly and ask for permission.  Provide your reasoning.  Give them your name and contact information, and sign a waiver if asked.

So where can you hunt mushrooms without asking first?  In Ohio, the answers are our State Forests (“State Forest” is part of the property name), the Wayne National Forest, and our State Wildlife Management Areas (“WMA” is part of the property name).

Where can you likely hunt, with advance permission?  Our Ohio State Parks (many, but not all, allow hunting, foraging for mushrooms, berry picking, etc.); your local city park; and cemeteries (the older and more derelict the better!).  Simply call first.

Collecting mushrooms and other living things is FORBIDDEN in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park; regional park districts (such as Cleveland Metroparks, Lake Metroparks, Summit MetroParks, Geauga Park District, etc.); Ohio State Nature Preserves (“Nature Preserve” is part of the property name); private residential camps and retreat centers (such as Camp Asbury and Boy Scout/Girl Scout camps), private Arboreta (Holden, Dawes, etc.); and University properties (such as Squire Valleevue and Valley Ridge Farms).

Why does it have to be this way?  Ohio is 44th in the nation with just 4.2 percent of our land in the public domain; 95.8 percent is all private property.  Public land includes highway right-of-ways!  So our tiny public properties hosting millions of visitors each year can’t possibly sustain all of our wants for free food, free landscaping rocks, free pets, or free flowers.  And private landowners have a right to maintain the resources on their properties for themselves or their paying guests/clients/students.  They have a right to protect themselves from lawsuits by people falling down their hillside, or drowning in their lakes.

So please, ask first.  Help us keep OMS a respected organization.  When we all act to keep our actions sustainable, we will continue to be welcomed.  Thanks!!

by Debra Shankland, OMS president

16 April 2018

Fusicolla Merismoides – A Fungal Potpourri

This is a remarkable species that is a conglomeration of various species resulting in an oozing, dripping orange slime. It is most often seen in the spring, often by morel hunters. It typically covers a grape vine or stump. It may form slimy stalactites of orange goo. No two samples have been found genetically identical. Some report a sweet smell which may come from yeast. The mix may also include a different yeast species which gives it the orange color and actually kills some of the other fungi involved. Some Zygomycetes are in the mix as well. There needs to be more study on this complex organism.

http://www.dnabarcodes2011.org/conference/program/schedule/treeslime.pdf

–Walt Sturgeon

 Fusicolla Merismoides by Walt Sturgeon

Fusicolla Merismoides by Walt Sturgeon

Fusicolla Merismoides by Walt Sturgeon

If you are interested in contributing to the mushrooms of the month please contact the web master using the contact form and he will provide you with submission information.