Where Can I Hunt Mushrooms?

Where Can I Hunt Mushrooms?

This is the third most common question that we at the Ohio Mushroom Society receive, right after “What kind of mushroom is this?” and “Can I eat it?”.  These are all very good questions, but often the answers are not simple.

Regarding foraging places, OMS volunteers work very hard to establish good relationships with public and private landholding institutions, and private landowners.  Some of these relationships take years to mature to the point where we are allowed to conduct a one-time, or even periodic forays, in exchange for the knowledge of species diversity that the landowners gain regarding their properties.  This trust can be instantly broken by rogue individuals using these properties as their “own” mushroom spot.

Imagine a motorist with a flat tire stuck in front of your house.  Decent human being that you are, you ask if you can help.  They have a spare, but no jack and no tools in the trunk.  Of course, you open your garage and allow them to borrow yours.  Now, how would you feel the next time you are barbecuing in the back yard, hear clanging and rustling in your garage, and after investigating, see the same individual helping themself to your tools to change their oil?!

So, Rule Number One of mushroom hunting is NO POACHING.  Please forage ONLY on properties where you currently have permission.

If you decide to take a risk and poach anyway, you DO NOT have permission from the Ohio Mushroom Society.  You DO NOT “know” any of our board members, or previous foray hosts.  Can you believe that a couple individuals, when confronted on private property, actually had the nerve to name-drop on an innocent gentleman who gave his personal time to provide an interesting and informative cultivation program to our members?!  This type of behavior will get you banned from the OMS.

What’s the harm?  There’s plenty for everyone!!  I’m not cutting down the “tree”, just harvesting some “fruit”.  If you are convinced that your actions are sustainable and that your activities do no harm, then do what we do and approach the landowner honestly and ask for permission.  Provide your reasoning.  Give them your name and contact information, and sign a waiver if asked.

So where can you hunt mushrooms without asking first?  In Ohio, the answers are our State Forests (“State Forest” is part of the property name), the Wayne National Forest, and our State Wildlife Management Areas (“WMA” is part of the property name).

Where can you likely hunt, with advance permission?  Our Ohio State Parks (many, but not all, allow hunting, foraging for mushrooms, berry picking, etc.); your local city park; and cemeteries (the older and more derelict the better!).  Simply call first.

Collecting mushrooms and other living things is FORBIDDEN in the Cuyahoga Valley National Park; regional park districts (such as Cleveland Metroparks, Lake Metroparks, Summit MetroParks, Geauga Park District, etc.); Ohio State Nature Preserves (“Nature Preserve” is part of the property name); private residential camps and retreat centers (such as Camp Asbury and Boy Scout/Girl Scout camps), private Arboreta (Holden, Dawes, etc.); and University properties (such as Squire Valleevue and Valley Ridge Farms).

Why does it have to be this way?  Ohio is 44th in the nation with just 4.2 percent of our land in the public domain; 95.8 percent is all private property.  Public land includes highway right-of-ways!  So our tiny public properties hosting millions of visitors each year can’t possibly sustain all of our wants for free food, free landscaping rocks, free pets, or free flowers.  And private landowners have a right to maintain the resources on their properties for themselves or their paying guests/clients/students.  They have a right to protect themselves from lawsuits by people falling down their hillside, or drowning in their lakes.

So please, ask first.  Help us keep OMS a respected organization.  When we all act to keep our actions sustainable, we will continue to be welcomed.  Thanks!!

by Debra Shankland, OMS president

16 April 2018

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Fusicolla Merismoides – A Fungal Potpourri

This is a remarkable species that is a conglomeration of various species resulting in an oozing, dripping orange slime. It is most often seen in the spring, often by morel hunters. It typically covers a grape vine or stump. It may form slimy stalactites of orange goo. No two samples have been found genetically identical. Some report a sweet smell which may come from yeast. The mix may also include a different yeast species which gives it the orange color and actually kills some of the other fungi involved. Some Zygomycetes are in the mix as well. There needs to be more study on this complex organism.

http://www.dnabarcodes2011.org/conference/program/schedule/treeslime.pdf

–Walt Sturgeon

 Fusicolla Merismoides by Walt Sturgeon

Fusicolla Merismoides by Walt Sturgeon

Fusicolla Merismoides by Walt Sturgeon

If you are interested in contributing to the mushrooms of the month please contact the web master using the contact form and he will provide you with submission information.

OMS Calendar of Events – 2018

OMS “Mini” Forays for 2018

West Branch State Park – Saturday, May 5th, 10 AM.  Contact Bryan Lewis at bwaynelewis@gmail.com or (917) 475-6135 for more information.

Hiram Ohio – Sunday, May 6th, 2 PM.  Contact Walt Sturgeon at mycowalt@comcast.net to register.

Wayne National Forest – May 6th.  This is part of the Wayne National Forest Bioblitz in partnership with Rural Action. Contact Martha Bishop at bishopm@ohio.edu or (740) 593-4552 for more information.

Pickerington, Ohio – Saturday, June 2, 10 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.  Mushroom foray in conjunction with a BioBlitz sponsored by the Ohio Wetlands Association.  Contact Shirley McClelland at (740) 215-5883 to register.

Wakeman – Sunday, June 24, 10:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. Please contact Pete Richards at peterichards@oberlin.net to register.

South-central Ohio – Sunday, July 29, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.   Contact Shirley McClelland at (740) 215-5883 to register.

Northwest Ohio – Saturday, September 29, time TBD.  Contact Bob & Joanne at (567) 208-3443.

Trumbull County – Sunday, September 30, 1 – 4 p.m.  Contact Pauline Munk at pjm23sag@gmail.com to register.

Columbiana County – Sunday, October 14, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.  Contact Walt Sturgeon at mycowalt@comcast.net to register.

Central Ohio – Saturday, October 20, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.  Contact Sharon Greenberg at d.greenberg@att.net or (330) 457-2345 to register.

OMS 2018 Summer Foray

Please join us for our Summer Foray July 14-15 at the recently renovated Zaleski ODNR Complex, 29371 Wheelabout Road, McArthur, Ohio 45651.

We will feature nationally known mycologists Walt Sturgeon and John Plischke, III.  Walt will serve as chief identifier for the foray and John will present our featured talk:  Boletes of the Northeast and Beyond.  Both Walt and John are nationally recognized as expert identifiers of fungi, and both have won numerous awards for their fungal photographs.

OMS 2018 Fall Foray

We are happy to return to Hiram, Ohio on the weekend of October 6 & 7.  Our foray mycologist and speaker will be Walt Sturgeon, author of Mushrooms of Appalachia, due out soon.  There will be limited on-site lodging available.  More details will be available in the next issue of the Mushroom Log.  In the meanwhile, contact Debra Shankland at dks@clevelandmetroparks.com for more information.

Other regional programs

Bentleyville, Ohio – Saturday, May 5, 7:30 p.m.  Illustrated slide talk on the Mushrooms of Ohio by Jerry Pepera.  Free and open to the public.  See http://clevelandnaturalscienceclub.org/may-2014-2/may-2014/ for more information.

Parma, Ohio – Three-part mushroom workshop May 10 – 12.  Includes two evening classes and ID workshop, a Saturday foray, plus the Cleveland Metroparks mushroom guide.  $17 fee includes all three parts and the guide.  Space is limited.  More information and registration is available at https://www.clevelandmetroparks.com/parks/programs-events/2018/west-creek-reservation/may/for-adults-only-mushrooms-i-ii-iii?instance=45737

Dawes Arboretum – Saturday, July 7 and Saturday, October 13.  Basic mushroom identification classes.

Beaver Creek Wildlife Education Center – Saturday, July 7 from 9:00 – noon – Mushrooms. Walt Sturgeon, a nationally recognized amateur mycologist with over 40 years of experience, will lead this event. This workshop will include a slide program, a collecting field trip, and a mushroom display. There will be information on distinctive, edible, and toxic species, basic taxonomy, fungal ecology, folklore, cooking tips, and ethnomycology (people and mushrooms). Participants may have edible mushrooms to take home. Participants are asked to bring a basket and wax bags or wax paper for collecting the mushrooms. Portions of the walk may be moderate to difficult walking. Please wear comfortable shoes and dress for the weather. Class size is limited to 22, so register early at beavercreekw@aol.com. Website: https://www.beavercreekwildlife.org/

Scenic Vista Park Mushroom display and walk – July 8, 2:00 – 4:00 PM
No RSVP required
http://www.bicycletrail.com/SVP.htm

Beaver Twp. Nature Preserve mushroom display and walk Oct 13, 1:30-3:30
http://beavertwpparks.webs.com/nature-preserve
No RSVP required.

Dick Grimm Memorial Banquet

This popular annual event will take place on Saturday, November 3, 6:30 p.m. at Wooster’s Broken Rocks restaurant.  We very much look forward to a presentation by mycologist, author and university professor Nicholas P. Money.  Registration information will be available in June.

2018 Summer Foray at Zaleski ODNR Complex

Summer Foray 2018 at Zaleski ODNR Complex

Dates:  July 14-15, 2018
Location:  
Zaleski ODNR Complex in Vinton County; 29371 Wheelabout Rd, McArthur OH 45651
Foray Organizer:  
Martha Bishop, bishopm@ohio.edu (740) 593-4552

Please join us for our Summer Foray in the beautiful and diverse forests of southeastern Ohio.

We will feature nationally known mycologists Walt Sturgeon and John Plischke, III.  Walt will serve as chief identifier for the foray and John will present our featured talk:  Boletes of the Northeast and Beyond.  Both Walt and John are nationally recognized as expert identifiers of fungi, and both have won numerous awards for their fungal photographs.

John Plischke, III is the author of Good Mushroom Bad Mushroom: Who’s toxic, Where to find them, and how to enjoy them safely, and Morel Mushrooms and Their Poisonous Look-alikes.  John is a founding member of the Western Pennsylvania Mushroom Club, and serves as Chair of the Photography Committee for the North American Mycological Association.

Walt Sturgeon has authored or co-authored and provided photographs for several popular mushroom books including Mushrooms of Ohio, Waxcap Mushrooms of Eastern North America, Mushrooms and Other Fungi of the West Virginia High Country, and has recently published Mushrooms of the Northeast with Teresa Marrone.  Walt serves as Awards Committee Chair for the North American Mycological Association.

Campsites and Cabins are available at nearby Lake Hope State Park.  Due to limited availability of cabin space attendees are encouraged to make reservations NOW.  Call 1-866-644-6727 or visit the Ohio DNR website.  Reservations will fill up quickly.  Athens is the closest location for other options.

 

 

Some Early Spring Ohio Fungi

Welcome to the February installment of Mushrooms of the Month.

Flammulina velutipes by Walt Sturgeon

Pseudoplectania nigrella by Walt Sturgeon

Sarcoscypha austriaca by Walt Sturgeon

Urnula craterium by Walt Sturgeon

If you are interested in contributing to the mushrooms of the month please contact the web master using the contact form and he will provide you with submission information.

Best Recipe for Large Morels

It seems a shame to cut up the large specimens that are sometimes found in great abundance around dead or dying elms. If Lady Luck has blessed you with such a find, try this easy recipe for stuffed Morels.
Morels Stuffed with Cheese
1/4 cup panko or other dry bread crumbs
1/4 cup grated Munster cheese
1/4 teaspoon basil
12 large morels: Prepare these with a quick soak in boiling water to which a handful of salt has been added. Drain and pat gently dry. Slit one side to insert cheese filling.
Place morels in a shallow browning pan slit side up, and brush with butter.
Broil for 5 minutes or until the mushrooms brown and the cheese melts.
Now go out and enjoy the hunt!
-From Shirley McClelland

March Mushrooms of the Month

Gallery

This gallery contains 5 photos.

Welcome to the March installment of Mushrooms of the Month. Note that “Mushrooms of the Month” refers to the mushroom photos which were submitted for publication in a given month, not necessarily that they are commonly found in that month. … Continue reading