(October) Mushroom of the Month

This should have been our Mushroom of the Month post for October but I’ve “FALL-en” behind, whoops! In any case, enjoy these polypores dressed in their autumn finest, as captured by Pete Richards. We think they’re Ischnoderma resinosa, but feel free to chime in in the comments if you have other ideas.

Look for an entertaining blog post from Walt Sturgeon next week!

Edible Fall Mushrooms

Have you spotted some of these edible fall mushrooms in your area? Yum!
Photo credit: Walt Sturgeon

Agaricus arvensis (horse mushroom)
Armillaria mellea (honey mushroom)
Armillaria solidipes (honey mushroom)
Clitocybe nuda (wood blewit)
Coprinus comatus (shaggy ink cap)
Grifola frondosa (maitake/hen-of-the-woods)

June Shrooms

June has been unusually dry in many places, but Board Member Pete Richards managed to capture these lovelies this month.

Young Mycena leaiana emerging from a rotting log in Oberlin Arboretum
Ductifera pululahuana found at the Augusta-Anne Olson State Nature Preserve on the Vermilion River in Erie County
Sarcoscypha sp found at the Augusta-Anne Olson State Nature Preserve on the Vermilion River in Erie County

Pheasant’s back jerky recipe

Here is a recipe for a common springtime edible mushroom, cerioporus squamosus or the Pheasant’s back, also called Dryad’s saddle. Although easy to identify, it’s not the tastiest of mushrooms…but with enough soy or barbecue sauce it can be pretty good!

Cerioporus squamosus by Walt Sturgeon

Marinade (adjust to your liking)

2 c. red wine vinegar
1/3 c. olive oil
swig of sesame oil
2/3 c. tamari (soy sauce)
2-3 cloves garlic, crushed
Optional liquid smoke

  1. Slice off the tender edge part of the mushroom into 1/2 inch thick slices.
  2. Marinate sliced mushrooms 2 nights in refrigerator.
  3. Arrange pieces on cookie racks and place over cookie sheets to catch drips then bake in 350 degrees F oven for 30 minutes, strips should still be tender.
  4. Cool and then brush w/vegan Worcestershire sauce or barbecue sauce and sprinkle with black pepper to taste.
  5. Place on dehydrator racks and dry for 12-24 hours, but don’t over-dry–leave a bit chewy.

Fusicolla Merismoides – A Fungal Potpourri

This is a remarkable species that is a conglomeration of various species resulting in an oozing, dripping orange slime. It is most often seen in the spring, often by morel hunters. It typically covers a grape vine or stump. It may form slimy stalactites of orange goo. No two samples have been found genetically identical. Some report a sweet smell which may come from yeast. The mix may also include a different yeast species which gives it the orange color and actually kills some of the other fungi involved. Some Zygomycetes are in the mix as well. There needs to be more study on this complex organism.

http://www.dnabarcodes2011.org/conference/program/schedule/treeslime.pdf

–Walt Sturgeon

 Fusicolla Merismoides by Walt Sturgeon

Fusicolla Merismoides by Walt Sturgeon

Fusicolla Merismoides by Walt Sturgeon

If you are interested in contributing to the mushrooms of the month please contact the web master using the contact form and he will provide you with submission information.

Some Early Spring Ohio Fungi

Welcome to the February installment of Mushrooms of the Month.

Flammulina velutipes by Walt Sturgeon

Pseudoplectania nigrella by Walt Sturgeon

Sarcoscypha austriaca by Walt Sturgeon

Urnula craterium by Walt Sturgeon

If you are interested in contributing to the mushrooms of the month please contact the web master using the contact form and he will provide you with submission information.